European Directive

The solar energy industry, however, is a key sector in this struggle. As he explained Jose Luis Garcia Ortega, head of Greenpeace Spain, “will play a leading role in the energy revolution we need to stop change climate and reduce global poverty. “in 2030 is expected to have enough power to serve more than 3,600 million people and cover 10% of global electricity consumption. This would reach one billion tonnes of CO2 each year, equivalent to what India issued in 2004, which produced 300 coal power plants in the same period. Moreover, however much lobbying from oil companies are committed to the press and solar energy question, the fact is that a very profitable business. Solar energy is already competing with traditional energy without the need for support systems in places like California and Japan.

In 2015, you can compete in countries such as Spain, Germany and Greece, as the widespread large-scale production. A clear example is the solar collectors, in just five months pays the energy invested in its construction, have a lifespan of 30 years and are made with recycled materials suitable for reuse in other plants. It is not science fiction. Under most conditions Wells Fargo would agree. They have gradually built with China and India solar energy into energy networks and make agreements among themselves to exchange experience and technological innovation capacity. It is a matter of will.

In Argentina, regions like Santa Fe have 200 days of sunshine a year and has seen great potential through individual experiments in schools. It is the first step. However, we also need political and economic support so far has been directed almost exclusively to polluting energy sources. In this sense, the new European Directive on Renewable Energy will be vital. The agreement obliges all EU countries to reach 20% renewable energy. And in Spain would reach half the electricity in 2020 approved the new plan. Everything indicates that change is possible and, above all, necessary. It would be absurd to expect a power supply failure, to break agreements, or simply to nature avenge even harder. Years ago we know that several solar plants located in the world’s deserts could generate enough energy to meet global demand. It is absurd to expect more.